Global Trading

Bitcoin uses cryptocurrency rather than fiat currency. Fiat currency means the price value of the cryptocurrency is not directly related to the economy or policies of any single country. It is defined as money declared by a government to be a legal tender. BY law, it is neither convertible to any other thing nor fixed in value. This online trading trades 24/7. The volatility nature gives opportunities for traders to reap quick benefits at any point.

Barter Dealings

An exchange is where buyers and sellers perform their business dealings. In a similar way, here a buyer deposits USD with the exchange and then he can buy cryptocurrency from the sellers. But unlike the stock market, there is no official exchange for this online trading system. Instead, there are hundreds of many exchanges around the world. As there is no official exchange, there is no official price for cryptocurrency too. Users have many choices and should consider the following factors when deciding on an exchange:

  • Regulation and Trust
  • Fees
  • Liquidity
  • Location

There are many exchanges all around and some of them that dominate the exchange markets are:

  • Bitfinex: It is the world’s number 1 exchange in terms of USD trading volume with about 25,000 BTC traded per day. Customers can trade with such online system without verification. Tether is also cryptocurrency associated with Bitfinex. It is with them that they share shareholders and management.
  • Bitstamp: It was found in 2011 and it is one of the oldest exchanges ever. It is the second largest exchange based on USD trading volume with little under 10,000 BTC per day.
  • OkCoin: An exchange which is China-based but trades in USD. It is a spot trading service between the currency pairs: BTC/USD, LTC/USD, EUR/USD and ETC/USD. The commission fee is charged for each transaction.
  • Coinbase: It is the first regulated exchange in the United States with about 8,000 BTC traded per day. It is the fourth largest exchange based on USD volume. It provides a secure platform for trading. It is free to use but works with transaction fees.
  • Kraken: It is the exchange in terms of EUR trading volume at approx of 6000 BTC traded per day. It is currently in the fifteenth position in terms of USD volume.

It is always good to get money with few clicks and without any strain. Using the source available, think wisely and invest your money properly to gain the fruits of quality service.

Programma

Programma

 

Monday, June 18, 2012

 

09:00 – 9.30: Registration and welcome coffee

INTRODUCTION

9.30-10:00 Saluti

Alberto Tesi, Università degli studi di Firenze, rettore

Mauro Guerrini, Università di Firenze, chair del seminario di studi

Rossella Caffo, Istituto Centrale per il Catalogo Unico delle biblioteche italiane, direttore

 

SECTION 1: LINKED DATA AS A NEW PARADIGM OF DATA INTERCONNECTION

Presiede: Daniela Tiscornia, ITTIG-CNR

10.00    Karen CoyleLinked data: an evolution

10.30   Aldo Gangemi, ISTC-CNR, Semantic technologies and linked data for the Italian PA: the case of data.cnr.it.

11.00   Giovanni TummarelloDigital Enterprise Research Institute (National University of Ireland, Galway) and Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), La frontiera tecnologica del web of data: tecnologie, adozione e prospettive 2012

11.30   Tom Baker, Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (DCMI), Designing data for the open world of the web

12.00   Paola Mazzucchi, mEDRA, Linked data: technology is here, but is it all we need?

12.30 Federico Morando, Politecnico di Torino – Nexa Center, Legal interoperability: making open government data compatible with businesses and communities

 

13:00 – 14:30 Lunch

 

SECTION 2: PUBLISHING VALUE VOCABULARIES AS LINKED DATA

Presiede: Mauro Guerrini, Università di Firenze

14.30 Alan Danskin, The British Library, Linked and open data: RDA and bibliographic control

15.00 Kevin Ford, The Library of Congress, LC Classification as linked data

15.30 Joan S. Mitchell, Michael Panzer, OCLC, Dewey linked data: making connections with old friends and new acquaintances

16.00 Marie-Veronique Leroi, Ministère de la culture et de la communication, France, Linked Heritage: a collaborative terminology management platform for a network of multilingual thesauri and controlled vocabularies

16.30 Giovanni Bergamin, Anna Lucarelli, Biblioteca nazionale centrale di Firenze, The Nuovo soggettario as a service for the linked data world

17.00 Tommaso Agnoloni, Ginevra Peruginelli, Maria Teresa Sagri e Daniela Tiscornia, ITTIG-CNR, Annotation schema for legal doctrine: a case study on DoGi database

17.30 Discussion

 

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

 

SECTION 3: TOWARDS A WEB OF DATA: STANDARDS AND APPLICATIONS

8:30-9:00: Welcome coffee

Presiede: Rossella Caffo, ICCU

9.00 Pat Riva, Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec and IFLA FRBR Review Group, FRBR Review Group initiatives and the world of linked data

9.30 Elena Escolano Rodrìguez, Ministerio de Defensa, Spain, ISBD adaptation to semantic web of bibliographic data in linked data

10.00 Michael Hopwood, EDItEUR, Patrizia Martini, ICCU, Commercial and cultural sectors: potential for linked data collaboration?

10.30 Axel Kaschte, Ex Libris, Linked open data on its way into next generation library management and discovery solutions

11.00 Tiziana Possemato, Atcult, Linked data: re-thinking knowledge. How software producers can accompany this revolution

11.30 Gordon McKenna, Collection Trusts, Linked heritage experience in linking heritage information

12:00 Jan Brase, German National Library of Science and Technology, The DOI, DataCite and linked data

12:30 Maurizio Lunghi, Fondazione Rinascimento Digitale, Trust and persistence for internet resorcina

 

13:00 – 14:30 Lunch

 

SECTION 4: THE PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND LIBRARY EXPERIENCES

Presiede: Maria Letizia Sebastiani, Biblioteca nazionale centrale di Firenze

14.30 Roberto Moriondo, Regione Piemonte, Open data for open PA: the Piedmont case

15:00 Gabriele MessmerBayerische StaatsbibliothekLinking library metadata to the web. The German experiences

15.30 Romain Wenz, Bibliothèque nationale de France, Linked open data for new library services: the example of data.bnf.fr

16.00 Martin Malmsten, National Library of Sweden, The disintegration and distribution of the record – cataloguing in the open

16:30 Paola Manoni, Biblioteca apostolica Vaticana, Metadata framework and application profiles in the global structure of catalogs and digitization projects of the Vatican Library

17.00 Romano Nanni, Biblioteca Leonardiana di Vinci (Firenze), e-Leo, digital archive for the history of Renaissance technics and science manuscripts.

17:30 Discussion and Conclusion

Stampa PDF

Copyright 2012 – Seminar “Global Interoperability and Linked Data in Libraries”

pagina creata il 21/02/2012, ultima modifica 14/03/2012

 

Modulo di registrazione

Modulo di registrazione

Please, fill in this form to register in the Seminar “Global interoperability and linked data in libraries” (Florence, 18-19 June 2012).

Si prega di compilare questo modulo per la registrazione online al seminario “Interoperabilità globale e linked data nelle biblioteche” (Firenze, 18-19 giugno 2012).

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Seminar ‘Global interoperability and linked data in libraries’
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Institution and country / Istituzione e nazione
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Seminario promosso da: 

Seminario promosso da:
Università degli studi di Firenze, Istituto centrale per il catalogo unico delle biblioteche italiane (ICCU), Biblioteca nazionale centrale di Firenze (BNCF), Casalini Libri, Conferenza dei rettori delle università italiane (CRUI), Associazione italiana biblioteche (AIB), Istituto di teoria e tecniche dell’informazione giuridica del Consiglio nazionale delle ricerche (ITTIG-CNR), Rinascimento digitale

Gli ultimi anni hanno registrato un aumento considerevole di risorse informative presenti sul web pubblicate seguendo i principi dei linked data per la interconnessione di dati strutturati. Le best practices relative ai linked data sono pronte per essere adottate da un considerevole numero di fornitori, con l’obiettivo di creare uno spazio globale di dati: il web dei dati. Sulla base di questo fenomeno, il Seminario di Firenze si occuperà del tema dell’interoperabilità e dell’apertura dei dati nel mondo delle biblioteche, analizzando gli standard, le esperienze e le norme di buona pratica per l’adozione di tecnologie del web semantico in questo settore.

Tale paradigma, orientato all’arricchimento dei dati e all’interconnessione, offre soluzioni a molti problemi attuali delle biblioteche, tra i quali la ricerca avanzata sul web, il controllo d’autorità, la classificazione, la portabilità dei dati e la disambiguazione. In questo contesto l’obiettivo del Seminario è evidenziare i vantaggi che il collegamento fra i dati offre alle biblioteche, fornendo suggerimenti sulle modalità operative con cui esse possono partecipare allo sviluppo del web semantico.

La partecipazione di operatori di diversa provenienza coinvolti nella comunicazione dei dati sul web è in grado di assicurare nuove opportunità di mercato, rinnovati modelli di pubblicazione e diffusione dell’informazione insieme a uno scambio prezioso fra diverse competenze professionali.

Argomenti:

§  Web dei dati

§  Linked data

§  Dati bibliografici aperti

§  Gestione e distribuzione  dei dati bibliografici

§  Scambio di dati aperti

§  Tecnologie per il web semantico

§  Condivisione della conoscenza e connessione dei dati

§  Sviluppo di standard tecnici aperti

§  Buone pratiche per la pubblicazione e la connessione di dati strutturati sul web

§  Archivi aperti

§  Accesso aperto

§  Modelli concettuali

§  Sistemi di organizzazione della conoscenza (Knowledge Organisation Systems – KOS)

§  Riutilizzo dei dati bibliografici

§  Schema di metadati condivisi

§  Open Library data

Coordinamento

§  Mauro Guerrini (Università di Firenze)

Segreteria scientifica

§  Ginevra Peruginelli (ITTIG)

Comitato organizzativo

§  Mauro Guerrini (Università di Firenze)

§  Ginevra Peruginelli (ITTIG)

§  Rossella Caffo (ICCU)

§  Giulia Maraviglia (Università di Firenze)

§  Antonella Marinaro (Università di Firenze)

§  Sandra Torre (Università di Firenze)

Comitato scientifico

§  Giovanni Bergamin (BNCF)

§  Rossella Caffo (ICCU)

§  Michele Casalini (Casalini Libri)

§  Roberto Delle Donne (Università di Napoli e CRUI-Commissione OA)

§  Sandra Di Majo (AIB)

§  Elena Escolano Rodríguez (Ministerio de Defensa)

§  Roberto Guarasci (Università della Calabria)

§  Mauro Guerrini (Università di Firenze)

§  Claudio Leombroni (Provincia di Ravenna)

§  Anna Lucarelli (BNCF)

§  Giulia Maraviglia (Università di Firenze)

§  Stefano Parise (AIB)

§  Ginevra Peruginelli (ITTIG)

§  Tiziana Possemato (Atcult)

§  Barbara Tillett (The Library of Congress)

 

Copyright 2012 – Seminar “Global Interoperability and Linked Data in Libraries”

pagina creata il 2012-02-24, ultima modifica 2012-03-14

 

Seminar promoted by: 

Seminar promoted by:
Università degli studi di Firenze, Istituto centrale per il catalogo unico delle biblioteche italiane (ICCU), Biblioteca nazionale centrale di Firenze (BNCF), Casalini Libri, Comune di Firenze, Conferenza dei rettori delle università italiane (CRUI), Associazione italiana biblioteche (AIB), Istituto di teoria e tecniche dell’informazione giuridica del Consiglio nazionale delle ricerche (ITTIG-CNR), Fondazione Rinascimento digitale

 

In the past few years, the amount of data published on the Web based on the Linked Data principles for publishing and connecting structured data on the Web has increased dramatically. Linked data best practices are now ready to be followed by a relevant number of data providers, leading to the creation of a global data space: the Web of Data. In such a context the Florence Seminar intends to focus on interoperability and open linked data in libraries, analysing standards, experiences and best practices for adopting semantic web technologies in this area.

Such paradigm of data enrichment and interconnection offers solutions to many of the actual library issues, like enhanced web searching, authority control, classification, data portability and disambiguation. In this context the Seminar’s purpose is to outline the benefits of linked data for libraries, while offering suggestions on practical ways in which libraries can participate in the development of the semantic web. The participation of different stakeholders, reflecting the actual trend in enhanced exchange of data, should ensure new market opportunities, the development of publishing and dissemination models, together with a fruitful exchange of professional experiences.

The seminar is bilingual. Presentations are given in English by foreign speakers (but some of them will speak in Italian) and in Italian by Italian speakers.

Topics

§  Web of data

§  Linked bibliographic data

§  Management of data and distribution in libraries

§  Open data exchange

§  Semantic web techniques and technologies

§  Knowldge sharing and connection of data

§  Development of open technical standards

§  Best practices for publishing and connecting structured data on the web.

§  Open archives

§  Open access

§  Conceptual models

§  Knowledge Organisation Systems (KOS)

§  Consuming and using library data

§  Standard vocabularies

§  Open library data

Coordination

§  Mauro Guerrini (Università di Firenze)

Scientific Secretariat

§  Ginevra Peruginelli (ITTIG)

Organising Committee

§  Mauro Guerrini (Università di Firenze)

§  Ginevra Peruginelli (ITTIG)

§  Rossella Caffo (ICCU)

§  Giulia Maraviglia (Università di Firenze)

§  Antonella Marinaro (Università di Firenze)

§  Sandra Torre (Università di Firenze)

Scientific Committee

§  Giovanni Bergamin (BNCF)

§  Rossella Caffo (ICCU)

§  Michele Casalini (Casalini Libri)

§  Gianfranco Crupi (Sapienza Università di Roma)

§  Roberto Delle Donne (Università di Napoli e CRUI-Commissione OA)

§  Sandra Di Majo (AIB)

§  Elena Escolano Rodríguez (ex ISBD Chair)

§  Roberto Guarasci (Università della Calabria)

§  Mauro Guerrini (Università di Firenze)

§  Claudio Leombroni (Provincia di Ravenna)

§  Anna Lucarelli (BNCF)

§  Giulia Maraviglia (Università di Firenze)

§  Stefano Parise (AIB)

§  Ginevra Peruginelli (ITTIG)

§  Tiziana Possemato (Atcult)

§  Barbara Tillett (The Library of Congress)

Copyright 2012 – Seminar “Global Interoperability and Linked Data in Libraries”

Page created 24/02/2012, last change 10/06/2013

 

Seminario promosso da: 

Seminario promosso da:
Università degli studi di Firenze, Istituto centrale per il catalogo unico delle biblioteche italiane (ICCU), Biblioteca nazionale centrale di Firenze (BNCF), Casalini Libri, Comune di Firenze, Conferenza dei rettori delle università italiane (CRUI), Associazione italiana biblioteche (AIB), Istituto di teoria e tecniche dell’informazione giuridica del Consiglio nazionale delle ricerche (ITTIG-CNR), Fondazione Rinascimento digitale

COMUNICATO STAMPA (pdf, 38 kb)

Gli ultimi anni hanno registrato un aumento considerevole di risorse informative presenti sul web pubblicate seguendo i principi dei linked data per la interconnessione di dati strutturati. Le best practices relative ai linked data sono pronte per essere adottate da un considerevole numero di fornitori, con l’obiettivo di creare uno spazio globale di dati: il web dei dati. Sulla base di questo fenomeno, il Seminario di Firenze si occuperà del tema dell’interoperabilità e dell’apertura dei dati nel mondo delle biblioteche, analizzando gli standard, le esperienze e le norme di buona pratica per l’adozione di tecnologie del web semantico in questo settore.

Tale paradigma, orientato all’arricchimento dei dati e all’interconnessione, offre soluzioni a molti problemi attuali delle biblioteche, tra i quali la ricerca avanzata sul web, il controllo d’autorità, la classificazione, la portabilità dei dati e la disambiguazione. In questo contesto l’obiettivo del Seminario è evidenziare i vantaggi che il collegamento fra i dati offre alle biblioteche, fornendo suggerimenti sulle modalità operative con cui esse possono partecipare allo sviluppo del web semantico.

La partecipazione di operatori di diversa provenienza coinvolti nella comunicazione dei dati sul web è in grado di assicurare nuove opportunità di mercato, rinnovati modelli di pubblicazione e diffusione dell’informazione insieme a uno scambio prezioso fra diverse competenze professionali.

Il seminario è bilingue. Le relazioni saranno presentate in inglese dai relatori stranieri (ma alcuni parleranno in italiano) e in italiano dai relatori italiani.

S’informa che le iscrizioni al Seminario sono state chiuse, essendo stato raggiunto il numero massimo degli iscritti.
Le relazioni finora giunte sono disponibili in preprint sul fascicolo provvisorio di JLIS.it

Argomenti:

Web dei dati

Linked data

Dati bibliografici aperti

Gestione e distribuzione  dei dati bibliografici

Scambio di dati aperti

Tecnologie per il web semantico

Condivisione della conoscenza e connessione dei dati

Sviluppo di standard tecnici aperti

Buone pratiche per la pubblicazione e la connessione di dati strutturati sul web

Archivi aperti

Accesso aperto

Modelli concettuali

Sistemi di organizzazione della conoscenza (Knowledge Organisation Systems – KOS)

Riutilizzo dei dati bibliografici

Schema di metadati condivisi

Open Library data

Coordinamento

Mauro Guerrini (Università di Firenze)

Segreteria scientifica

Ginevra Peruginelli (ITTIG)

Comitato organizzativo

Mauro Guerrini (Università di Firenze)

Ginevra Peruginelli (ITTIG)

Rossella Caffo (ICCU)

Giulia Maraviglia (Università di Firenze)

Antonella Marinaro (Università di Firenze)

Sandra Torre (Università di Firenze)

Comitato scientifico

Giovanni Bergamin (BNCF)

Rossella Caffo (ICCU)

Michele Casalini (Casalini Libri)

Gianfranco Crupi (Sapienza Università di Roma)

Roberto Delle Donne (Università di Napoli e CRUI-Commissione OA)

Sandra Di Majo (AIB)

Elena Escolano Rodríguez (già IFLA ISBD Review Group)

Roberto Guarasci (Università della Calabria)

Mauro Guerrini (Università di Firenze)

Claudio Leombroni (Provincia di Ravenna)

Anna Lucarelli (BNCF)

Giulia Maraviglia (Università di Firenze)

Stefano Parise (AIB)

Ginevra Peruginelli (ITTIG)

Tiziana Possemato (Atcult)

Barbara Tillett (The Library of Congress)

 

Copyright 2012 – Seminar “Global Interoperability and Linked Data in Libraries”

pagina creata il 24/02/2012, ultima modifica 10/06/2013

 

Terminology

Terminology

[Source:  D3.1 Best practice report – Terminology (PDF3451 kb)]

The main outcome of the Athena WP4 activity consisted in elaborating recommendations addressed to the European Museums. We give here a short reminder of these recommendations that we have updated thanks to the larger scope of the Linked Heritage project. These reviewed recommendations are of high importance for the finalisation of the technical specifications of the WP3 Terminology
Management Platform.

The conclusion made consequently to the analysis of the survey results make it clear that monolingual in-house terminology resources are a reality that we can’t ignore at European level.

Thus these recommendations take into account this reality and give guidelines to institutions so they can keep their in-house terminologies adapted to their needs and means and however make it compliant with the requirements of the Semantic Web.

These recommendations have been published as a booklet “Your terminology as a part of the Semantic Web: recommendations for design and management” within the Linked Heritage project.

You can find a detailed presentation of these recommendations with examples and tools in this booklet which is both available in printer and digital form.

We structured the recommendations according to the main stages corresponding to the “lifetime” of a
terminology resource. The following schema presents you these main stages:

CONCEIVE YOUR TERMINOLOGY

The first one “Conceive your terminology” gives the main considerations and requirements to keep in
mind to create in the best way a terminology resource, ie as recommended a thesaurus. Here are the
tasks inherent to this first step:

INSERT IMAGE

INSERT IMAGE

A1 : Define your domains

This step is important to define the overall strategy of the terminology. If the domain of a terminology is too large it won’t be efficient for the descriptions of collections. On the contrary if a terminology is too specialised and focused on one domain, another terminology might be useful because this one is too limited because too specific. The definition of the domains covered by your cataloguing and indexing process is then important to create the general structure and hierarchy of the terminology.

A2 : Identify your user’s expectations

The target of the terminology is important as well. Indeed a terminology aiming at professionals only will be much more accurate than a one aiming at the general public. It is therefore important to define at the conception step if the terminology will be used only for cataloguing and indexing used by professionals or if the general public will also use the terminology to access the collections of the institutions. This could be also important regarding the choice of the license for the terminology.

A3 : Define your connection with the datamodel

Institutions use terminology for describing a collection or an object. This description is generally ruled by a datamodel. Some fields of this datamodel require terms from a controlled vocabulary. At the conception step it is important to define which fields of the datamodel will use the terminology in order to settle the domains and terms of the terminology.

A4 : Choose the terms for the semantic description of your digital resources

This task is consequent to the previous ones. Indeed the choice of the terms depends on the
domain(s) covered by the terminology, the users that will be using the terminology and the fields from
the datamodel that require a controlled vocabulary. This task is crucial both for indexing process and
retrieval of information and but not definitive as a terminology almost like languages needs evolution
through the time.

A5: Organise your terms into a thesaurus structure

As the thesaurus is the kind of terminology that we recommend, a logical recommendation is to organise terms and domains within a thesaurus structure. The more a term is connected to another one the more your terminology will be exploitable by human users and machines as well. Thesaurus offer both hierarchical and associative relationships. Exploiting in the best way these features can improve the efficiency of the terminology.

A6: Find equivalent terms in other languages

Very few terminologies described in the survey results are multilingual. Some countries dealing with several official languages have to provide multilingual content, then multilingual terminologies as well.

One best practice would be to enrich a terminology with equivalent terms in other languages even if it is not something mandatory according to the policy of the country. Reference terminologies and other terminologies corresponding to the domains and available in the terminology registry could be used to
proceed with this multilingual enrichment.

A7: Implement your thesaurus

The final task for the conception stage is the technical implementation of the thesaurus. Indeed the technical format (Spreadheet, XML, database, …) has to be defined here in order to make the thesaurus technically available. Several norms exist in order to cover the whole process of conception of a terminology but the latest one ISO 25964-1 that we already mentioned is the most adapted as it takes into account the technological reality of the institutions. After this serialization process, the terminology can be integrated into the collections/objects’ management system.

B : MAKE IT INTEROPERABLE

The second stage consists in making a terminology interoperable. This consists mainly in SKOSifying,
e.g. converting into SKOS the thesaurus that was technically implemented in the previous stage.

B1: Evaluate how far SKOS is compliant with your terminology features

The first task is to define is SKOS is the most convenient format for the kind of terminology you may have. Indeed an authority file with author names may need a more appropriate format such as FOAF. So there must be an evaluation of the benefits using SKOS without losing any information or implying wrong information or inferences because of the SKOS datamodel.

B2: Roughly SKOSify your terminology

Here is the SKOSification task. We suggest to roughly SKOSify as some tools exist and help to proceed automatically with the SKOSification of a thesaurus. By rough SKOSification we mean an automatic process for converting a terminology into SKOS. A detailed SKOSification would be the one validated by the human expert. The Terminology Management Platform (TMP) of Linked Heritage will have a dedicated module for the SKOSification so this step could be done with the least cost and mean possible.

B3: Define with precision the labels expressing concepts

This task is directly correlated with the task A4 : Choose your terms. Indeed the terms of the thesaurus will be the labels expressing the concepts. So this task must be done with attention since the SKOS datamodel has some requirements regarding the labels and their languages. You can refer to the second deliverable of the Athena project, ‘D4.2 Guidelines for mapping into SKOS, dealing with translations’ to get more detailed information on SKOS and precise guidelines helping for SKOSification.

B4: Identify your concepts and validate the structure

This task results from the transition from a descriptor/term based resource to a concept-based kind of resource. Indeed with the thesaurus terms were descriptors, keywords used for description but according to the SKOS model, these terms and descriptors become labels expressing concepts. This little difference of perception may imply some modification in your modeling. This is why the concepts of a terminology have to be identified in order to consolidate the organisation of the concepts of the terminology.

The question of the persistent identifiers in order to give a unique identifier to each concept of a terminology has been raised several times in the framework of the Thematic Working Group. This unique identifier is required by the principles of the Semantic Web and Linked Data. Therefore we strongly recommend to use a persistent identifier system for the identification of concepts within a terminology.

You can refer to the booklet that was published in the framework of the Athena WP3 (Workpackage dedicated to the standards) on ‘Persistent identifiers: recommendations’.

B5: Ensure the documentation of concepts

As we already mentioned it, a terminology will evolve through time as the language evolves as well. This is why it is important to keep track of the details and information that might be useful for an obsolete label or to remove the ambiguity between two identical labels expressing two different concepts. SKOS offers a large choice of notes in order to ensure the documentation of the concepts.

Elements inherent to the language issue (orthography, grammar, …) can be recorded here.

B6: Map your concepts

This task is correlated with the A5 task (A5: Organise your terms into a thesaurus structure). Indeed for that task, the general structure and organization of terms within the thesaurus have been defined. Then the mapping of concepts is a refinement stage of this structure thanks to the features of SKOS.

This mapping can be done through the possible hierarchical (skos:broader, skos:narrower) or
associative (skos:related) relationships.

B7: Map your (multilingual) terms

As the mapping of the concepts has been done in the framework of the previous task, the mapping of terms can be done. It mainly consists in arranging the labels. This task is particularly important for the multilingualism as the mapping of terms can help enriching the terminology with multilingual labels.

This task is correlated with the A6: find equivalent terms in other languages. It is about transposing these equivalencies in the SKOS structure of the terminology respecting its datamodel and keeping all the relevant information of your thesaurus.

B8: Validate your SKOSification
The benchmark done in the framework of the Athena WP4 showed that several tools exist for the validation of the final SKOS output of the terminology. The simplest one is Pool Party30 which can proceed with a syntax validation online from an RDF file uploaded from a local repository. The upcoming SKOSification module of the TMP will perform this validation of the SKOS consistency on the go with the SKOSification process.

C : LINK IT TO A NETWORK

This last stage is the one which allows an institution to publish a terminology and make it available to the Web. As the previous stage ensured the interoperability and the SKOSification of the terminology, this one is fully compliant with the principles of the Semantic Web and the Linked data. This final stage gives the final recommendations to make the terminology part of the Semantic Web by linking it to existing networks of terminologies.

C1: Definition of metadata on your terminology

This task intends to give the basic information about the terminology so it can be searched and retrieved easily within a terminology registry. Indeed the first step to link a terminology to a network of terminologies is to provide a description of it especially the date of creation, the authors, the domains covered by the terminology. Usually the fields of the Dublin Core are relevant and complete enough to provide quality metadata of the terminology. The terminology registry of the TMP will also provide a metadata form so institutions when uploading their terminology can feed the terminology registry with the terminology and its metadata.

C2: Identification of resources for mapping

This task consists in identifying all the terminology resources that could be mapped with the terminology just created. It supposes to browse terminology registries and find resources that cover the same domains for enriching your own terminology with missing concepts or ensuring multilingualism with equivalent terms in other languages. Another use case can also be the integration of a related domain in your terminology if it is in the same language than your terminology. This task is connected to the A1: Define your domains and A2: Define your users’ expectations since other terminology resources can help achieving these tasks.

C3: Mapping with other resources

This task has a direct reference to the B3: Define with precision the labels expressing your concepts and B6: map your concepts. Indeed this task is about finding manually or automatically all the concepts that could be relevant to be integrated or just mapped with because these are concepts from the same domain, or concepts from a domain that is not the same but related or because the concepts are expressed in several languages and the terminology can then be enriched and become multilingual. In this perspective, you can notice that the use of a unique and persistent identifier is crucial for the mapping of two different terminology resources.

C4: Validation of the interoperability

This validation step as the B8: Validate your SKOSification is the final task to get a terminology interoperable and part of a network of terminologies. The only way to check and validate the interoperability is its integration within a search engine and making queries and then test all the semantic inferences that could done through the semantic mapping done thanks to the SKOSification
and the mapping. The Terminology Management Platform intends to provide all the necessary features for these stages of the terminology especially for ensuring the interoperability and providing the needed mapping features. As a search and visualization interface will be developed the SKOSification and
interoperability would be easily validated within a same user interface.

Coordinator:
Istituto centrale per il catalogo unico delle biblioteche italiane

Viale Castro Pretorio 105
00185 Roma, Italia
tel. 39 06 49210427
fax 39 06 4959302
info[at]linkedheritage[dot]org

 

LINKED HERITAGE is solely responsible for the content of this site, which does not represent the opinion of the European Commission. This site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike 2.5 (by-nc-sa) License

Page created 2013-12-18, last change 2013-12-19

 

Registration Form – LH Workshop nazionale, Padova, 6 marzo 2013

Registration Form – LH Workshop nazionale, Padova, 6 marzo 2013

Compila questo modulo online per registrarti al Workshop nazionale di Linked Heritage “Il patrimonio culturale digitale verso Europeana e CulturaItalia: aspetti tecnici e metodologia” che si terrà a Padova il 6 marzo 2013, presso l’Università degli Studi di Padova.

Top of Form

Modulo di registrazione, Workshop Linked Heritage, Padova, 6 marzo 2013

Cognome e nome

Istituzione

Città

Parteciperò al workshop

 

Parteciperò al laboratorio

 

E-mail

The fields in bold are required

Bottom of Form

Coordinator:
Istituto centrale per il catalogo unico delle biblioteche italiane

Viale Castro Pretorio 105
00185 Roma, Italia
tel. 39 06 49210427
fax 39 06 4959302
info[at]linkedheritage[dot]org

 

Copyright 2011-2013 LINKED HERITAGE Project. LINKED HERITAGE is solely responsible for the content of this site, which does not represent the opinion of the European Commission. This site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike 2.5 (by-nc-sa) License

Page created 2013-01-23, last change 2013-02-01

 

Content aggregation: tools & guidelines

LINKED HERITAGE – Coordination of Standards and Technologies for the enrichment of Europeana

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Home > Content aggregation: tools & guidelines

Content aggregation: tools & guidelines

  • GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR PROVIDERS
  • USEFUL INFORMATION TO AGGREGATE CONTENT FOR EUROPEANA
  • GUIDELINES ON THE USE OF THE LINKED HERITAGE AGGREGATOR (MINT)
  • LIDO
  • BASIC RULES FOR MAPPING
  • MAKING THE LINK WITH EUROPEANA

GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR PROVIDERS

Keep WP6 coordinators informed about your ingestion plan: updates, changes, substitutions of the material/collections, adding of new collections/providers, any issue for uploading and publication.

Write Marzia Piccininno (marzia.piccininno@beniculturali.it) and Valentina Vassallo (v.vassallo@cyi.ac.cy).

  • Marzia Piccininno – Valentina Vassallo, Guidelines for the ingestion procedure (PDF, 49 kb)

USEFUL INFORMATION TO AGGREGATE CONTENT FOR EUROPEANA

Europeana only ingests and indexes the institution’s metadata while the digital object remains at the original institution or aggregator.

An aggregator in Europeana context collects metadata from a group of content providers and transmits them to Europeana. Aggregators:

  • gather material from individual organisations,
  • standardise the file formats and metadata,
  • channel the latter into Europeana according to the Europeana guidelines and procedures and,
  • support the content providers with administration, operations and training.

Linked Heritage is an aggregator in the context of Europeana

  • Nasos Drosopoulos, Cultural Heritage Aggregation in Europe(PDF, 223 kb)

GUIDELINES ON THE USE OF THE LINKED HERITAGE AGGREGATOR (MINT)

The Linked Heritage aggregator (MINT) can be reached at the following url:

http://ipa.image.ntua.gr:8080/linkedheritage/

Browsing: please use Firefox or Chrome (Explorer is not supported).

Registration:

  • New users can create an account through the “Register” page
  • When registering an organization, please use a distinctive name including location instead of e.g. National Museum which is too generic
  • You can apply to an existing organization during registration or through user profile (for returning users).
  • If your organization is not registered in the system and you will be acting as administrator, you should register leaving the “Organization” field blank. This will grant you administrative rights to create your own organization and manage all its users and data.
  • If you are acting as coordinator for organizations in your country, we advise that you create an organization that will serve as the aggregator e.g. “Ministry of Culture”. Administrators of respective organizations that will be monitored by the aggregator can subsequently set it as the ‘parent’ (alternatively, an aggregator can create all the sub-organizations himself and assign users/administrators to them).
  • When a user applies for an organization the administrator is notified through email in order to validate and assign appropriate role. More info on available user roles & rights can be found in the tool’s home page.

Data import:

  • The tool can only handle xml representations of metadata. They can be uploaded in single file (containing one or more items) or multiple ones bundled in a ZIP archive (rar compression is not currently supported), or can be harvested from an OAI repository. Make sure that the files you are trying to import contain valid xml.
  • Characters like “

‘ ‘
” ”
< <
> >
& &

Overview:

  • Use this page to browse all imports made for the organization/s you have access to. Follow the indicated steps (1.define item root, 2.define mappings, 3.transform your items) for each import dataset. Mappings can be edited and reused.
  • You can switch between import and item view using the options provided and you can also preview the mappings and final transformation by using the item view.
  • Transformation and OAI harvesting

Both processes can be time consuming and may also be queued for completion depending on the system’s load. You can logout and check back later to see status updates.

Helpdesk:

Technical issues, questions, suggestions and feature requests should be directed to the Linked Heritage helpdesk. If you are not registered in the mailing list, please send the relevant registration form).

LIDO

  • 26 September 2011. Regine Stein, Introduction to Lido (PDF, 3463 kb)
  • 26 September 2011. Gordon McKenna, Using Lido (PDF, 213 k)
  • Linked Heritage – LIDO mapping worksheet (.doc)
  • Spectrum – LIDO mapping worksheet (.doc)
  • LIDO – ESE mapping worksheet (.doc )
  • For more information on LIDO visit: http://www.lido-schema.org

BASIC RULES FOR MAPPING

  • Before starting your mapping, plase read this document about the LIDO mandatory elements (PDF, 840)
  • Map first the mandatory elements; make sure that the respective fields in your source data are filled in. Individual data providers can decide on how light – or how rich – they want their contributed metadata records to be.
  • Populate indexing elements if possible, and only in second step display elements (people tend apparently to fill in only display elements because it seems easier but is usually not appropriate).
  • Analyze your source data for event-mediated information: look for implicit event types in field names and for qualifier elements.
  • Think of your data outside of your own context – add implicit information: e.g. the repository name, if you map the inventory number.

MAKING THE LINK WITH EUROPEANA

Europeana element Definition and notes Data requirements
isShownBy An unambiguous URL reference to the digital object on the content provider’s web site in the best available resolution/quality. (i.e. a link to the content as a text, image, sound, or video file not to the webpage with it on).

Data here will allow the full functionality of Europeana and the automatic generation of

a thumbnail by them.

If this cannot be given then you must provide data for isShownAt.

Must be valid URI (e.g. URL)
isShownAt An unambiguous URL reference to the digital object on the content provider’s website in its full information context.

If this cannot be given then you must provide data for isShownBy.

Must be valid URI (e.g. URL)
object For image thumbnails, if you can give a URL to a thumbnail on your website then give that URL here. However these thumbnails smaller than 110 pixels high then it will be scaled up to that size by Europeana.

If you do not have a thumbnail then you may give the same data as in isShownby element.

Must be valid URL
type The Europeana material type of the resource. Must be: TEXT or IMAGE or

SOUND or VIDEO

provider Name of the organisation that is delivering content to Europeana.

If the provider is not an aggregator then use this element.

If the provider is an aggregator then use this element for the name of the aggregator.

For the name of the provider to the aggregator use the element source.

 
  • Partners SHOULD supply a link to a thumbnail preview which is preferably the same width or slightly larger than the requirements of Europeana (currently 200 pixel wide). Partners SHOULD NOT supply a link to a very large image (i.e. much wider than 200 pixels). If the thumbnail is larger than the requirements, Europeana WILL REDUCE it. If smaller, Europeana WILL NOT RESIZE it (It is recommended that content providers look into possibilities to supply bigger size source images for image caching if possible).
  • Partners SHOULD NOT supply a link to a ‘dummy’ thumbnail that indicates that there is no image or that no image can be displayed for IPR reasons. If this in not easily possible, partners SHOULD supply the URL of the ‘dummy’ thumbnail to Gordon.
  • Europeana WILL NOT ACCEPT records without showing a digital object (image, etc.) on the partner’s site. However, these records CAN BE UPLOADED on the Linked Heritage tool.

See also FAQs

 

Coordinator:
Istituto centrale per il catalogo unico delle biblioteche italiane

Viale Castro Pretorio 105
00185 Roma, Italia
tel. 39 06 49210427
fax 39 06 4959302
info[at]linkedheritage[dot]org

 

LINKED HERITAGE is solely responsible for the content of this site, which does not represent the opinion of the European Commission. This site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike 2.5 (by-nc-sa) License

Page created 2011-09-27, last change 2014-02-21

 

Padova: Linked Heritage Fifth Plenary Meeting and WP Technical meetings (Reserved to partners)

Padova: Linked Heritage Fifth Plenary Meeting and WP Technical meetings (Reserved to partners)

Italy

6-8 March, 2013 – Linked Heritage events

Venue:
University of Padua – Emeroteca Ca Borin Via del Santo 22

PRELIMINARY PROGRAMME

Wednesday 6 March

10:00-13:00: Training on MINT for LH content providers
14:00-17:00: WP7 Training on Lods

Thurday 7 March

9:30-13:00 Working group meetings

  • 9:30-10:45 WP7 meeting
  • Coffe break
  • 11:15-13:00: WP4 meeting

13:00 Buffet Lunch

14:00-17:45 Plenary meeting (First part)

18.00 Guide Tour to Teatro Anatomico and Cattedra di Galileo (registration requested)
20.30 Social Dinner (registration, each participants pays for himself)

Friday 8 March 

9:00-13:00 Plenary meeting (Second part)

14:00-17:00 Working group meetings

  • WP3 meeting

REGISTRATION (RESERVED TO LINKED HERITAGE PARTNERS)

It is now possible to register to Linked Heritage plenary meeting, WG meetings, training workshops and social events which are planned in Padua on March 6th to 8th 2013.

The registration form is available at: www.eventbrite.com/event/5317685340. Please, make separate registrations for all the people who are coming for your organisation.

USEFUL INFORMATION

How to reach Padova

By AIR

The nearest airport is the “Marco Polo” airport in Venice, 20 kilometers (12 miles) east  from Padova.

Other airports: Treviso (62 Km), Verona (86 km), Bologna (120 km)

The best way to go to Padova from Venezia airport is by bus (1 hour). You can take a FSBUSITALIA bus (blue buses). Tickets can be purchased in the Arrivals Hall, at the ATVO booth (cost  8.50 euros). The tickets can also be bought on board bus (10  euros). Exit the Arrivals Hall and turn right. You must get off at the bus station in Padova.

Note that the taxi rank is in front of the railway station, 2 minute walk from the bus station .

You can also take a bus to Venezia-Mestre and there take a train to Padova. From Venezia airport you have to take an ACTV bus (orange buses) or ATVO FLYBUS bus and get off at the Venezia-Mestre railway station.  You can buy tickets at the automatic ticket machines.

All the trains going from Venezia-Mestre to Milano, Bologna  or Roma, plus several local trains, stop in Padova. For info check the Italian Railway Web pages (Trenitalia).

From Venice Marco Polo Airport you can also reach Padova by a shuttle service. That is more expensive, but will leave you exactly at your hotel. You can choose two different companies (reserve a seat at least 24 hours in advance):

AIRSERVICE:
e-mail: airservice@taxipadova.it
tel.: +39-049-8707840
FAX: +39-049-8705050
Fare: at most 31 euros (depending on the number of people travelling)

LANDOMAS:
e-mail: landomas@landomas.it
tel.: +39-049-8601426
fax: +39-049-8601642
Fare: at most 30 euros (the price can be lower, depending on the number of people travelling)

How to reach the venue

The Training workshops (MINT and VLE/LOs), the Plenary and the
WGs technical meetings will be held at the:
Emeroteca di Ca’ Borin,
Via del Santo, 22 – 35123 Padova

Itinerary: http://maps.google.co.uk/maps/ms?msid=212992545759562652936.000494385e181b42c9187&msa=0

From the railway or bus  station: get on the TRAM (direction CAPOLINEA SUD Guizza) and get off at “Ponti romani” . Walk towards Via San Francesco -> Via del Santo (about 5 minutes) .

Other useful information

Selected hotels

Closest hotels to the meeting place:

  • Majestic Toscanelli Palace
    http://www.toscanelli.com/index.php
  • Hotel Giotto
    http://www.hotelgiotto.com/
  • Belludi 37
    http://www.belludi37.it/it/
  • Albergo Verdi
    http://www.albergoverdipadova.it/
  • Hotel Al Santo
    http://www.alsanto.it/
  • Hotel M14
    http://www.hotelm14.it/home/
  • Casa del Pellegrino
    http://www.casadelpellegrino.com/
  • Al fagiano
    http://www.alfagiano.com/index.php/it/
  • Hotel Europa
    http://www.hoteleuropapd.it/

Other Hotels

  • NH Mantegna
    http://www.nh-hotels.it/nh/it/hotels/italia/padova/nh-mantegna.html
  • Hotel Galileo
    http://www.hotelgalileopadova.it/
  • B4
    http://www.b4hotels.com/ita/hotels/padova/hotel-4-stelle-padova.html
  • Hotel Milano
    http://www.hotelmilano-padova.it/
  • B&B Padova
    http://www.hotelbb.it/it/hotel-padova/hotel

Getting around (transports and maps)

http://www.unipd.it/en/discovering-padova/getting-around

Discovering Padua (general information on Padua)
http://www.unipd.it/en/discovering-padova-0

Healthcare and primary services
http://www.unipd.it/en/discovering-padova/healthcare-and-primary-services

 

Documents to download

  • LH Plenary meeting, Padova, 6-8 MArch 2013: Agenda

Coordinator:
Istituto centrale per il catalogo unico delle biblioteche italiane

Viale Castro Pretorio 105
00185 Roma, Italia
tel. 39 06 49210427
fax 39 06 4959302
info[at]linkedheritage[dot]org

 

Copyright 2011-2013 LINKED HERITAGE Project. LINKED HERITAGE is solely responsible for the content of this site, which does not represent the opinion of the European Commission. This site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike 2.5 (by-nc-sa) License

Page created 2011-04-21, last change 2011-11-19